Sunday, July 17, 2011

Women's World Cup thoughts

Whether or not you like the final result, I hope you will agree with me that Julie Foudy and Ian Darke were superb commentators during the Women's World Cup games on ESPN. Their knowledge of the game and the players came through. Their pacing was excellent. Although playing to a US audience, they were not overly chauvinistic. They truly enhanced the play on the field, an unusual result.

As Americans deal with their disappointment in the final score, it is heartwarming to think of people in Japan who have something good to think about after this year's devastation from earthquakes and tsunamis.

And, finally, in what might be a politically incorrect note, I repeat a joke I heard this week that was making the rounds amongst a group from the Subcontinent. It might explain why India did not have a team in the tournament:

India never wins soccer games. Whenever they get a corner they open a shop.

10 comments:

Whipple said...

What a great game. Japan won, the U.S. did not, nor did they lose. That is the beauty of sport.

About this blog said...

I lol'd at the joke. Ops, no offense meant. ;p

Anonymous said...

Yes they do;and thus they don't have to get a bailout, hunt for someone else's oil or write useless memoirs to make a living.

Peter Kokolski said...

I agree with you Paul ... ESPN in this case got it just right. A welcome respite from what I would call "typical American" soccer coverage.

MidChris said...

Personally my family watched it all together and when Ian said OHNO the soccer players name we all kept thinking he was going for the U.S till we saw her jersey actually said. "OHNO" haha.

Stevie the K said...

bada BING

gardenkeeper said...

Well said.
So many Japanese are depressed.
This means so much more than you can imagine.
I am so proud of "Nadeshiko Japan" (team's nickname)

Anonymous said...

Yes, if the US women had to lose, then I am glad they lost to Japan, who really needed that lift.

As someone who doesn't follow soccer, though, what does your comment below mean, Paul? I am missing something.

" Although playing to a US audience, they were not overly chauvinistic."

nonlocal

Paul Levy said...

Sports announcers covering international events for US audiences are often so mawkishly patriotic that they skew the coverage of the game and miss or misinterpret what's actually going on. These two presented an accurate and honest assessment during the match, even while displaying some hope for the US side. For Julie, especially, being a former member of the US team, that must have been difficult. Yet, she could draw the balance between her loyalty to the home team and her job in explaining to the viewers what was really happening.

Indian Doc said...

Oh well, I don't follow soccer much, but the last joke, well, that got me. In fact, there are several versions of that running through our hospital at any time! :P @anonymous: take a chill pill!