Thursday, March 26, 2009

Inviting Grand Rounds submissions

I have been asked to host medical Grand Rounds -- the weekly rotating carnival of the best of the medical blogosphere -- on Tuesday, March 31. I hope that I will stimulate a large number of submissions on the following topic: When things go awry.

This is a topic that draws on my desire to encourage greater transparency in the delivery of clinical care. In the spirit of Dr. Ernest Codman, I ask doctors, nurses, and other providers to write about actual incidents in which they made or were present for a medical error. Please explain the circumstances and what you did in response to the situation. But, equally important, please tell us how you felt about the event and how it changed your practice of medicine afterward. Of course, please conform to the requirements of HIPAA in your submission.

I also ask patients who have been the victim of, or loved-ones who have seen, clinical harm to relate their personal stories. Tell us how your provider(s) responded, and how the event has changed your view of the practice of medicine and what advice you would give to the profession.

And, to get the most prominence for this edition of Grand Rounds, a posting that includes commentary from both a provider and his/her patient will get the highest rating.

I will not be publishing submissions on other topics. Sorry, but I want to have a specific focus this week.

Please submit your entries by Sunday evening, March 29 to plevy [at] bidmc [dot] harvard [dot] edu, and include "Grand Rounds" in the subject line. Many thanks.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Mr. Levy,
Are there restrictions on length?

The Mommy Blawger said...

Wonderful! I don't usually read Grand Rounds, but I will be sure to read yours. I've hosted Blawg Review twice; it's quite an experience.

Paul Levy said...

Dear Anon,

Just please be reasonable, as there will be multiple submissions. I reserve the right to edit . . .

Anonymous said...

It would be very productive if providers identify systems and processes that compromise the quality of care they deliver. Training often focuses on individual variation and individual performance. But improvement is about systems, and herein lies the real opportunities. Providers and patients are in the best position to weigh in - or Call Out.

Anonymous said...

This is a great idea for a carnival, but I think you're missing the point of Grand Rounds. Or maybe you get the point, but hijacked it anyways.

Paul Levy said...

Actually, it is not missing the point or hijacking anything. Here is an excerpt from the instructions GR hosts are given:

"Some editions of Grand Rounds are ‘theme editions’. You can look through the Grand Rounds archives to see examples. However, if you want submissions based on a theme, the time to let people know is during your call for submissions the week before you are to host."

AlvaroF said...

Paul: I do appreciate the ability to focus, and also help organize Encephalon - a similar carnival focused on brain & mind topics.

Yes, hosts can propose theme editions. But the widespread/ consensus understanding, in my view, is that those themes are optional, not mandatory and exclusionary. Grand Rounds is a weekly vehicle and community for all great health & medical blogging - it is not the When Things Go Awry blog carnival (which might be a worthy section inside Grand Rounds, for example).

Having said that, what makes a carnival fun and worthy is the creativity and hard work by the Host, so, no matter the "rules", have a great time preparing a great edition.

Paul Levy said...

Many thanks, Alvaro. I have received so many excellent and thoughtful posts on this topic that I think it would dilute them to add other topics. Beyond blog postings, I have received specially written essays for the occasion, from people who have no blogs. So, this should be an interesting variation from the norm. I hope you all like it.

Anonymous said...

Wish I'd seen this earlier. I'd had written about my experience at your hospital last year.